Losing a vital sense

Over 450,000 Australians are blind or vision impaired

Over 450,000 Australians are blind or vision impaired

About 90% of vision loss is preventable

About 90% of vision loss is preventable

85% of all vision loss is among people over 50

85% of all vision loss is among people over 50

Your vision can be impacted by many different things throughout your lifetime. Whether it be through an accident, illness, injury, genetic inheritance or an ongoing vision condition, any person can experience low vision at any time.

We rely on our vision for many essential daily activities, so a significant change in vision or loss of sight can greatly affect our mobility and independence.

Guide Dogs Queensland provides support for anyone who is experiencing difficulty as a result of blindness or low vision. Thankfully, the right support and training can help to minimise the impact of potentially debilitating conditions on people’s lives.

Conditions that cause low vision and blindness

Learn more about some of the common causes of blindness and vision loss, as well as the impact they can have on someone’s mobility and independence. See what it’s like to live with some of the most common vision conditions.

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Glaucoma

Glaucoma

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Cataracts

Cataracts

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Macular Degeneration

Macular Degeneration

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Glaucoma

Glaucoma

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Cataracts

Cataracts

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Macular Degeneration

Macular Degeneration

Image of the Brisbane skyline

Normal Vision

An example of how the Brisbane skyline might look to someone with Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa

The impact of low vision

Could you imagine if performing seemingly ordinary tasks became difficult or even totally impossible? Having low vision can have a significant impact on your:

Work and social life

Loss of vision can result in the loss of many things that we often taken for granted. In the first instance, someone with declining vision might lose the ability to drive their children to school or themselves to work. It can become difficult to meet and talk to people, and eventually many people can become unable to recognise the faces of their family or friends.

Domestic and personal care skills

Many of us rely on our sight to take care of ourselves, our family and our home. Without your vision, it can become incredibly challenging or even impossible to do seemingly simple things like cleaning your home, doing the laundry or preparing a meal for yourself or your loved ones. With limited vision, it can even be difficult to choose an outfit, do your hair or put on makeup.

Ability to communicate

Without our vision it becomes much harder to communicate with others, which can result in loneliness and isolation. When a person loses their sight they often lose the ability to read and write, make eye contact and recognise non-verbal cues, which are all very important to helping us interact with and feel connected to the people around us.

Mental and physical wellbeing

Vision is a vital sense that most of us count on to keep safe and live life the way we choose. Depending on when vision loss occurs, someone with low vision can be more at risk of hazards and accidents, become prone to anxiety, lose their confidence in getting around their community, and experience other mental or emotional difficulties.

Low vision doesn’t equal low quality of life

Thanks to the ongoing support of the community, we are able to help people with low or no vision reach their goals and experience everything life has to offer. Our services are all tailored to ensure blind and vision impaired Queenslanders can fulfil their potential and live life the way they choose. Whether someone wants to be able to maintain their home, do their groceries on their own or get to school, university or work independently, we provide all the support and training they need to get there.

A lady and her Guide Dog

It would be hard without an organisation like Guide Dogs. To think there’d be no one to help you with a white cane or a Guide Dog. It would be hard to leave the house, to have a life.

Marita
Guide Dog handler
A black Guide Dog puppy

Your donation makes a real difference

You can help Queenslanders in need regain their independence by giving to Guide Dogs Queensland.

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A lady sitting with her Guide Dog

A Guide Dog is considered the most advanced mobility aid and can change your life.

A Guide Dog isn’t the right option for everyone, but for some people it’s the only option. We’ll talk you through what’s involved in committing to the ultimate mobility aid and companion.

Learn about our Guide Dogs

Alanna is here to guide you through your options and help connect you with the right support.

Phone
Call 1800 810 122
Address
Guide Dogs Queensland Breeding and Training Centre
1978 Gympie Rd, Bald Hills Qld 4036
Office
Monday - Friday | 8:30am - 4:30pm
Contact
Contact Client Services online
Portrait image of a female Guide Dogs Queensland team member
Alanna
Your Support Coordinator