Have you ever had to ask for assistance when using a touchscreen EFTPOS device at the shops?

For a device that is aimed at creating an easy customer experience, it has only complicated it for some shoppers.

Without a tactile keypad or voice output for the numbers, people with low or no vision have even found themselves in stressful situations where they have had to verbalise their PIN to a complete stranger while trying to use the devices.

For two Australians living with low vision, the detrimental impact of EFTPOS machines and the lack of action being taken pushed them to launch a discrimination case against the Commonwealth Bank.

Graeme Innes and Nadia Mattiazzo took action in 2016 after finding it almost impossible to use the devices without assistance.

After over a year of campaigning, the Commonwealth Bank have finally settled, agreeing to roll out new software with improved accessibility for people who are blind or vision impaired.

Blind Citizens Australia, who have been supporting this campaign, have also launched a standalone campaign of their own. They are campaigning for the implementation of Audio Description on Free-To-Air TV, so that people with low or no vision can enjoy TV, film and live performances.

Blind Citizens Australia and Guide Dogs Queensland are encouraging the general public to contact their Federal MPs to prompt them to take action to improve the accessibility of TV for all Australians.

Click here to find out more about how you can help.

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